creativity tagged posts

Let’s get meta: on the revision process

September 8, 2016 Writing  No comments

“When you’re writing a story, you’re telling yourself the story. When you rewrite, your main job is taking out all the things that are not the story.” - John Gould according to Stephen King in On Writing

Just as the themes changed as the story developed, so too did the scenes and characters.

There is the story the readers get, and the story the writer knows.

In the first draft, Charlie was this brick wall hard-ass. He was immovable. Impenetrable. To the point that you were left wondering why Jamie even cared at all. He was, as the lingo goes, unsympathetic. Maybe he still is, but at least in the final version, he has some redeeming qualities.

And so, I guess what I’m trying to get at is, that while he is now more fully

Read More

Feels a lot like dysfunction

April 14, 2016 Writing  No comments

I’ve always said that, to me, writing is like exorcising demons.

But no, not like, it is exorcising demons.

I just have to get it out. I can't not do it — a sentiment many artists have said in one form or another.

And it sounds so romantic, doesn’t it?

So poetic.

Can’t you picture the writer toiling away at his desk in the wee hours of the morning, pouring his heart out onto the page, burning that midnight oil?

Can’t you see the musician, guitar in hand, trying out chords, scribbling and crossing out lyrics in a worn notebook, rearranging pieces until the song is just right, until it says what he needs to say, how he needs to say it?

Can’t you

Read More

Book Bewitchery 101: Big Magic… what I’d suspected all along

December 9, 2015 Book reviewWriting  No comments

It just took Elizabeth Gilbert writing this beautiful piece of work, and hitting it over my head repeatedly, for me to—finally—get it. (And also, thanks to my wonderful friends who gifted me with this book in the first place.) 

Creating—writing, in my case—is not about the outcome (in fact, Gilbert says, it can't be). It is not about how it is received by others. It is not about what others say or do or think about your creation. It is not about money. It is not about reviews or ratings or sale rankings. It is not about who knows you. It is not about numbers. It is not about success. It is not about suffering. It is not about saving the world. It is not about anything external. 

None of those things matter. 

Because creativity is not about anyone or anything else

Read More

The Creative Process: is encounter

January 31, 2014 Writing  No comments

 The Creative Process series is my way of trying to understand how creative people create.

To create is an act, a verb, if you will. It is not passive, but active and requires participation. Creativity is the process of "bringing something new into being," (The Career Guide for Creative and Unconventional People).

Creating is completely depleting and often you reach a point where you don't think you can continue for another second because what you see in your head is not translating through your words or art.  So, frustrated and weary, you go watch some Netflix or go to the bar to drown your sorrows with some alcohol, and then the next day you get back up and do it again.

Because you're compelled to - by the encounter.

The encounter is the

Read More

The Creative Process: is confrontation

January 10, 2014 Writing  3 comments

 The Creative Process series is my way of trying to understand how creative people create.

The creative process is the way in which an artist creates or brings something new into being. It's the vision; the crafting of an idea; the act of sculpting, painting, molding, filming, acting, writing; it's the drafting process; the editing process; the act of engaging oneself wholly; it's taking what one see's in their imagination and bringing it forth into the world.

But before creation can begin, a confrontation must take place.

Because, you see, artistic people of whatever medium (graphic design, film, music, painting, drawing, writing, acting, etc) are people who are highly sensitive to the world around them. They see and perceive the chaos, the beauty, the complexities,

Read More